Improve Your In Home Wi-Fi Experience

If your home is like many in our area, you have high-speed internet from Volcano Communications Group. Volcano brings the internet to your home, and from there a router sends a Wi-Fi signal that can connect wireless devices to the internet today and in the future. To make sure you receive the best Wi-Fi signal, you need a Wi-Fi network that will work well throughout your home. Managed Wi-Fi service from Volcano will set up and maintain your Wi-Fi network to maximize the performance of all your connected devices:

• It's convenient: we supply the equipment—you don’t have to purchase anything from a store.

• No hassle: we’ll do the work of making sure your wireless devices connect to your Wi-Fi network.

• More for you: optimize your internet connection to get maximum speed.

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One Low Price - just $4.95/month

 

No purchase necessary - we provide the equipment

Safe and secure - we’ll setup password and encryption

Ongoing support - we’re here when you have questions or need help 

Volcano Managed Wi-Fi Frequently Asked Questions...

Q: I already have a router, why do I need another one from Volcano?

A: Your router’s technology could be outdated without you being aware of it. When shopping for a new router, it may be difficult to know what to purchase - many wireless routers available online and at retail stores may not have the capability of sending a strong enough Wi-Fi signal. You may pay for a higher speed internet connection, but your router may not be allowing that level of speed to all your connected devices.

Q: Why should I pay a monthly fee after I get a Volcano router installed?

A: Routers are electronic equipment and as such have the potential to stop working – or work with reduced efficiency. In addition, you may add more wireless devices over time – this can impact the performance of your wireless network. With Volcano’s Wi-Fi services, we will monitor your router to make sure it’s operating at peak efficiency. If necessary, we will replace the router free of charge and provide router software updates. Our technicians will help trouble shoot problems with you.

Q: What’s the difference between “Wi-Fi” and “internet”?

A: People often use the terms Wi-Fi and internet interchangeably. Wi-Fi and internet are two distinct services and knowing the difference is important:

 

Internet – your connection to the world

The internet is a wide area network (WAN) that connects computers from around the world. To access the internet, you must subscribe to service from an Internet Service Provider (ISP) such as Volcano Communications Group.

Other than turning it on or off, and choosing what provider and speed to pay for, your internet connection is beyond your control.

 

Wi-Fi – connecting devices to the internet

A Wi-Fi network is independent from the internet. The devices in the network connect wirelessly to a Wi-Fi router and together they form a wireless local area network (LAN). The Wi-Fi router is connected to the internet source via a broadband modem (in some cases the modem and Wi-Fi router are one piece of equipment). Devices connected to a Wi-Fi network can work together and share information. You control your Wi-Fi network, including where you place your router, the security restrictions you put on it including passcode, determining what devices can access it, and which devices can share information with other devices.

 

 

Questions? Call us at: 209.296.7502 | 888.886.5226

 

 

Need help formatting bulk email messages?



My bulk email is delivered to my recipient's spam folder! What do I do?




 

Bulk email has become a tricky issue. To many, a regular message from a central source such as your local theater or community organization is a blessing. To others, it is annoying. The Federal Trade Commission has adopted a ruling call the CAN-SPAM Act in an attempt to curb spamming activity. Non-compliance can be costly in many ways. Here's a link to the detail of the act:

https://www.business.ftc.gov/documents/bus61-can-spam-act-compliance-guide-business

Here are the top rules to keep your bulk email messages compliant:

Physical Address

• Your message must include your valid physical postal address. This can be your current street address, a post office box you’ve registered with the U.S. Postal Service, or a private mailbox you’ve registered with a commercial mail receiving agency established under Postal Service regulations.

Opt-In

• Ensure that you are only sending mail to users who specifically requested it. It is not advisable to purchase mailing lists or subscribe users by having an opt-in checkbox automatically checked on your website. • It is preferable to have a double/confirmed opt-in process. When users subscribe to your mailing list, send them an email asking them to click to confirm their opt-in. This will reduce the number of people who sign up from fake email addresses.

• When users subscribe to your mailing list, tell them what mail to expect, how often to expect it, and what it will look like. Set recipient expectations clearly.

Easy Unsubscribe

• Provide an obvious and visible unsubscribe process in your mail.

• Make it easy for users to unsubscribe from your mailing list. • Ensure the unsubscribe process is easy to use, such as a one-click unsubscribe web page. • Users should not have to log into a website in order to unsubscribe.

• Process unsubscribes immediately.

Note: If your bulk email message continues to land in your recipient's spam filter, the recipient's local spam settings may be responsible. You may want to add an advisory to your email instructing them to add your email address to their email whitelist.

 

Need help formatting bulk email messages?



My bulk email is delivered to my recipient's spam folder! What do I do?




 

Bulk email has become a tricky issue. To many, a regular message from a central source such as your local theater or community organization is a blessing. To others, it is annoying. The Federal Trade Commission has adopted a ruling call the CAN-SPAM Act in an attempt to curb spamming activity. Non-compliance can be costly in many ways. Here's a link to the detail of the act:

https://www.business.ftc.gov/documents/bus61-can-spam-act-compliance-guide-business

Here are the top rules to keep your bulk email messages compliant:

Physical Address

• Your message must include your valid physical postal address. This can be your current street address, a post office box you’ve registered with the U.S. Postal Service, or a private mailbox you’ve registered with a commercial mail receiving agency established under Postal Service regulations.

Opt-In

• Ensure that you are only sending mail to users who specifically requested it. It is not advisable to purchase mailing lists or subscribe users by having an opt-in checkbox automatically checked on your website. • It is preferable to have a double/confirmed opt-in process. When users subscribe to your mailing list, send them an email asking them to click to confirm their opt-in. This will reduce the number of people who sign up from fake email addresses.

• When users subscribe to your mailing list, tell them what mail to expect, how often to expect it, and what it will look like. Set recipient expectations clearly.

Easy Unsubscribe

• Provide an obvious and visible unsubscribe process in your mail.

• Make it easy for users to unsubscribe from your mailing list. • Ensure the unsubscribe process is easy to use, such as a one-click unsubscribe web page. • Users should not have to log into a website in order to unsubscribe.

• Process unsubscribes immediately.

Note: If your bulk email message continues to land in your recipient's spam filter, the recipient's local spam settings may be responsible. You may want to add an advisory to your email instructing them to add your email address to their email whitelist.

OPTIMIZE YOUR WI­FI

Ever wonder why the connectivity of your wireless router varies from one room to another? There are many things that can aff­ect the performance of your wireless system. The list below are things to consider when your Wi-Fi home network isn't performing at full strength:

                                      

OBSTACLES INTERFERING WITH THE "LINE OF SIGHT"

When your Wi-Fi router is placed in a location that is blocked by obstacles, its radio signal will be weakened. Plaster or brick walls tend to have the most negative impact. Cabinets or furniture will weaken the signal to some degree. Obstructions tend to reside closer to floor level; therefore, some folks prefer to install their wireless access point/router on or near the ceiling.

 

REFLECTIVE SURFACES

Some Wi-Fi signals bounce off­ of windows, mirrors, metal file cabinets and stainless steel countertops, lessening both network range and performance.

 

HOME APPLIANCES THAT SEND WIRELESS SIGNALS IN THE SAME FREQUENCY RANGE

Such appliances include some microwave ovens, cordless telephones, baby monitors, and home automation equipment. Appliances that transmit in the 2.4 GHz frequency range are most likely to generate Wi-Fi interference. If possible, assure that the wireless access point or router is at least 3 feet away from these types of appliances.

 

ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT

Electric fans, small motors (heaters and vacuums) and fluorescent lighting generate interference that can weaken your Wi-Fi signal.

 

To position your wireless equipment for optimal network performance, experiment. Try placing the device in several diff­erent locations. Strive to install the wireless access point or router in a central location. While trial-and-error may not be the most scientific way to find a good spot for your equipment, it is often the only practical way to assure the best possible Wi-Fi performance.

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